Category Archives: Uncategorized

Art in Film: Neruda

On January 31, 2017, our Art in Film group reviewed Neruda.  An investigator launches a search for Pablo Neruda, a Nobel Prize-winning Chilean poet, who became a fugitive in his own country for his Communist leanings during the 1940s.

Released December 16, 2016.  Directed by Pablo Larraín.

Art in Film reviews include an indepth review and rating of the film’s composition, realism, artistic, cinematography, musical score, direction, writing, and whether or not our reviewer likes the story/film enough to recommend film to a friend.  Ratings given on a 1 to 10 scale, where a rating of 1 is awful and 10 is excellent.  In addition to rating components of a film, we also provide reviewers with a written questionnaire.

Film review:

Neruda was a brilliantly made film combining a well written and directed story with Neruda’s poetry.  All reviewers highly recommend their friends view this film.  Our reviewers mostly women and seniors.

Reviewer Comp Real Art Cine Music Dir Writ Rec?
Glenn Lippman (Org)  8  10  10  10  10 10 10  10
Rosette Rubins  8  9  9  10  10  9  9  9
Marly Silverman 9  9  9  10  10  9  10  9
Miriam Weiss  9  10  10  10  10  10  10  9
Average Review 8.5  9.5 9.5 10 10  9.5 9.8 9.3

Our overall review and how we compare.

95%   Art in Film Review
96%   Rotten Tomatoes
73%   IMDb

Art in Film: Elle

On December 27, 2016, our Art in Film group reviewed ElleMichèle seems indestructible. Head of a leading video game company, she brings the same ruthless attitude to her love life as to business. Being attacked in her home by an unknown assailant changes Michèle’s life forever. When she resolutely tracks the man down, they are both drawn into a curious and thrilling game—a game that may, at any moment, spiral out of control.

Released May 25, 2016.  Directed by Paul Verhoeven.

Art in Film reviews include an indepth review and rating of the film’s composition, realism, artistic, cinematography, musical score, direction, writing, and whether or not our reviewer likes the story/film enough to recommend film to a friend.  Ratings given on a 1 to 10 scale, where a rating of 1 is awful and 10 is excellent.  In addition to rating components of a film, we also provide reviewers with a written questionnaire.

Film review:

Elle is a psychothriller featuring a very strong and powerful woman with strong sexual content.  Although the acting and film’s technical components are very good, the storyline was not well liked by our reviewers.  About half of our reviewers would not recommend the film to their friends.  Our reviewers mostly women and seniors.

Reviewer Comp Real Art Cine Music Dir Writ Rec?
Glenn Lippman (Org)  6  8  10  8  10 8 10  9
Elana Ben-Kerem  9  9  8 10  10  7  9  9
Maria Elvie  9  5  8  10  10  8  8 5
Kim Hough  6  2  9  10  6  6  8  1
Helen Rubenstein  6  1  9  7  6  5  9  4
Marly Silverman  10  8  9  10  10  9  8  1
Caryn Wachsler  8  3  8  5  5  8  5  3
Miriam Weiss  9  9  10  10  10  8  9  7
Carol Weissman  8  7  10  10  10  6  9  7
Average Review 7.9  5.8  9.0  8.9  8.6  7.2  8.3  5.1

Our overall review and how we compare.

80%   Art in Film Review
90%   Rotten Tomatoes
73%   IMDb

Art in Film: No Pay, Nudity

On December 6, 2016, our Art in Film group reviewed No Pay, Nudity. Lester Rosenthal has spent his whole life as an actor waiting for his big break. But his last big job was some years past, and he now hangs around the Actor’s Equity lounge with his colorful, out-of-work actor friends. With a stalled career fraying Lester’s very last nerve, and his beloved dog having to be put down, Lester descends into deeper depression. But a role playing the Fool in a local hometown production of “King Lear” may teach Lester about small pleasures.

Released November 2016. Directed by Lee Wilkof.

Art in Film reviews include an indepth review and rating of the film’s composition, realism, artistic, cinematography, musical score, direction, writing, and whether or not our reviewer likes the story/film enough to recommend film to a friend. Ratings given on a 1 to 10 scale, where a rating of 1 is awful and 10 is excellent. In addition to rating components of a film, we also provide reviewers with a written questionnaire.

Film review:

No Pay, Nudity’s reoccurring theme of aging and realism of acting as a career gave us an opportunity to rate this film relatively high.  Good acting. Our reviewers mostly women and seniors.

Reviewer Technical Components
Recommend Film
Glenn Lippman (Org) 9.2 8.2
Sherry Arrowsmith 8.5 3.0
Maria Elvie 9.5 8.0
Brenda Nagel 7.5 4.0
Howard Rothauser 7.5 5.0
Marly Silverman 9.9 9.5
Caryn Wachsler 8.8 6.0
Miriam Weiss 9.1 8.0
Carol Weissman 9.0 8.0
Average Review 8.8 6.6

Our overall review and how we compare.

88% Art in Film Review
71% Rotten Tomatoes
62% IMDb

Art in Film: Year By The Sea

On February 28, 2017, our Art in Film group reviewed Year by the Sea.  After 30 years as a wife and mother, Joan retreats to Cape Cod rather than follow her husband to Kansas. Intent on rediscovering herself, but plagued with guilt, she questions her decision until stumbling upon a spirited mentor. Supported by her literary agent and a host of locals, including a sexy fisherman, Joan learns to embrace the ebb and flow of life.

Released February 24, 2017.  Directed by Alexander Janko.

Art in Film reviews include an indepth review and rating of the film’s composition, realism, artistic, cinematography, musical score, direction, writing, and whether or not our reviewer likes the story/film enough to recommend film to a friend.  Ratings given on a 1 to 10 scale, where a rating of 1 is awful and 10 is excellent.  In addition to rating components of a film, we also provide reviewers with a written questionnaire.

Film review:

Year by the Sea’s reoccurring theme of aging, self-learning were overshadowed by the film’s sense of miss direction and boredom.  Only about half of our reviewers would recommend this film to their friends.  Our reviewers mostly women and seniors.

Reviewer Comp Real Art Cine Music Dir Writ Rec?
Glenn Lippman (Org)  2  10  3  4  8 1 9  4
Denise Geller  10  7  10  10  9  9  8  9
Nechama Glasrot  8  8  9  7  10  8  8  10
Judy Moskowitz  3  1  1  6  1  1  1  1
Brenda Nagel  5  4  4  7  6  3  2  2
Marly Silverman  8  8  9  8  9  8  10  9
Caryn Wachsler  9  1  8  8  4  4  4  7
Miriam Weiss  6  7  8  7  5  5  3  4
Carol Weissman  7  8  8  7  3  4  4  7
Average Review  6.4  6.0 6.7  7.1  6.1 4.8  5.4 5.9

Our overall review and how we compare.

61%   Art in Film Review
35%   Rotten Tomatoes
82%   IMDb

Art in Film: Equity

EquityOn August 23, 2016, our Art in Film group reviewed Equity.  When Senior investment banker Naomi Bishop (Anna Gunn) is passed over for a promotion at her firm, she fights for the opportunity to take a start-up public, hoping this promising IPO will secure her a place at the firm’s highest level. But when an employee at the start-up raises questions about a possible crack in the company’s walls, Naomi must decide whether to investigate rumors that may compromise the deal, or push forward with the confidence her superiors expect. Soon Naomi finds herself tangled in a web of deception and office politics and begins to question if there is anyone she can trust. As the IPO draws closer, Naomi sees that the choices she has made for her career have left her very much alone. Forced to reexamine the rules of the cutthroat world she has always loved she finds herself in a fight for her very survival.

Released July 29, 2016.  Directed by Meera Menon.  English.

Reviewers:

Elana Ben-Kerem (%); Glenn Lippman (%, Discussion/Review Leader); Judy Moskowitz (%); and Penny Mandel (%).

Art in Film: Embrace of the Serpent – %

Embrace of the SerpentOn March 22, 2016; our Art in Film group reviewed Embrace of the Serpent.  In the early 1900s, a young shaman (Nilbio Torres) in the Colombian Amazon helps a sick German explorer (Jan Bijvoet) and his local guide (Miguel Dionisio Ramos) search for a rare healing plant.  Subtitled.  IMDb rated 8.2 out of 10; Rotten Tomatoes gave it 99%; Metacritic gave it 82%.

Released February 17, 2016.  Subtitled.Directed by:  Ciro Guerra.  Cast included Nilbio Torres as the young Karamakate (shaman); Antonio Bolivar Salvador as the older Karamakate (shaman); Jan Bijvoet as Theo; and Brionne Davis as Evan.

This film proved to be very complex with many metaphors and interpretations.

Reviewers:
Gerrie Beck, Bud Davis, Kim Hough, Robin Kapan, Miriam Katz, Glenn Lippman (Discussion/Review Leader), Judy Moskowitz, Bebe Nagel, and Susan Robbins.  Film was seen at FAU’s Living Room Theater.

 

 

Art in Film: Closed Season – 86%

Closed SeasonOn January 26, 2016; our Art in Film group reviewed Closed SeasonIn 1942 Fritz and Emma hide a Jewish refugee at their remote farm in the Black Forest. As the couple has unhappily remained childless, Fritz suggests an unorthodox deal and asks Albert to conceive a child with Emma on his behalf. The consequences are dramatic: Emma discovers her sexuality, Fritz cannot control his jealousy and Albert feels trapped between the two of them. Against the background of war, an unpredictable drama unfolds that turns offenders into victims and vice versa.

Film released January 15, 2016.  Directed by Franziska Schotterer.  Cast included Brigitte Hobmeier as Emma; Christian Friedel as Albert; and Hans-Jochen Wagner as Fritz.

This film proved to be a very complex story with many interpretations.  Our review was a diverse viewpoint discussion on the many elements to the story.

Reviewers:
Bebe Nagel, Bud Davis, Caryn W., Deanna, Elinor Steffensen, Gerrie Beck, Glenn Lippman (Discussion/Review Leader), and Kim Hough.

Suggested Movie Headlines included:  Emerging Betrayals; A woman Scorned; Necessity; and Betrayal and Awakening.

Most Memorable Scenes:  Emma giving a book to Albert; Fritz witnessing sex differently; Albert giving necklace to Fritz; Emma discovering that jewelry was made by Albert; Emma’s discovery of love and sex.

Closed Season

Which scenes were missing, in other words, the following scenes would have helped reveal the story:  A moment of Albert’s past; Emma’s conflict more deeply exposed; Albert’s kibbutz life; More time to develop Albert’s relationship with his son.

Which scenes to shorten or remove:  Remove Germans joking about Jews; Too many times when Fritz waited outside the door; and Reduce the number of scenes with Walter.

The film summary stated that passion, betrayal and jealousy were underlying emotions portrayed.  Our reviewers expanded list of emotions to include:  anxiety; fear; desperation; anguish; sadness; and loneliness.

We learned that roebuck is a male deer; alcohol’s effect on a good person; and shooting birds at night.

Our reviewers also agreed that the photography was perfect … lots of gray tones and muted colors to illustrate contrasts; captured the time frame of the 40’s in a German countryside.

Audience should be adult to understand the complexities of the relationships formed.

Summary.  Our detailed film review brought out more depth in the film than when first observed.  Closed Season left our reviewers with more questions than answers.  For example, (a) did Albert choose Kibbutz life as a way to continue to punish himself for the guilt he felt for shunning Emma, falling in love with her and accepting Fritz’s request?  (b) did Closed Season intend to describe Emma or Fritz?  (c) did Albert invite his son back because it became clear to Albert that his son was growing up just like him?  (d) did Fritz kill himself?  etc.  Great film, well written, never a dull moment, kept us engaged, and well directed.

Our reviewers rating for this film ranged from a low of 70% to a high of 100%.  Average was 86%.

Art in Film: Heart of a Dog – 68%

On DecemHeart of a Dogber 29, 2015; our Art in Film group reviewed Heart of a DogAn impressionistic and musical meditation on a pets death with prelude by the artist Laurie Anderson, who enjoyed a very deep relationship with her dog, with following soundtrack.The film centers on her remembrances of her late beloved piano-playing and finger-painting dog Lolabelle. Scenes range from realistic footage from the animal’s life to imagined scenes of Lolabelle’s passage through the bardo (according to Tibetan tradition, refers to the state of existence intermediate between two lives on earth). It also includes other reflections on life and death including Anderson’s experiences in life in downtown New York after 9/11.

Reviewers:
Bebe Nagel, Carol Weissman, Caryn W., Gerrie Beck, Glenn Lippman (Discussion/Review Leader), Jonathan Kahn, Josh W., Judy Moskowitz and Rose.

Suggested Movie Headlines included:  Laurie Anderson Free Association of Death; Picture of Life; Love, Death, Surveillance, and RatTerriers; Love & Death; Psychedelic Philosophy.

Most Memorable Scenes:  Snowing in Chicago; Ice Skater; Dog as Prey; Loss of Freedom; Impermanence of all living things; Dog Playing the Piano.

Lolabelle and Anderson connection:  Soulmate, Symbiotic

We learned about mixed media, Tibetan traditions, Sudden Infant Death.  Several profound quotes:  “Purpose of death was release of love.”  And in defining night, “we fall through time, and Day is the space between Nights.”

Photography was excellent and more specifically scenes photographed well included:  Hiking and Dog Walk; Unfocused scenes; windowshield photo shots; mountain scenes, rolling backwards to illustrate bardo; and various dream states.

Summary.  Movie included several dark undertones in a very artistic illustration on connection between mother daughter; a love connection with her dog and family memories.  A shared view by all of our reviewers was that this film scores high for originality, photography and uniqueness.

Our reviewers reviewed this film with a broad range of scores from a low of 20% to a high of 93% and an average of 68%.

Review reported by Glenn Lippman.

Comments:

“Varied opinions, and a terrific discussion.  Personally, I like the movie!”  Caryn W.

“Kudos to Glenn for leading a very good discussion about a movie that was controversial.  We didn’t hold back and had lots of laughs too!”  Gerrie Beck

Art in Film: Mr. Holmes – 86%

mrholmesOn July 21, 2015; our Art in Film group reviewed Mr. Holmes. Mr. Holmes is a new twist on the world’s most famous detective. Movie takes place in the year 1947. Holmes faces the end of his days tending to his bees, with only the company of his housekeeper and her young son, Roger. Grappling with the diminishing powers of his mind, Holmes comes to rely upon the boy as he revisits the circumstances of the unsolved case that forced him into retirement, and searches for answers to the mysteries of life and love – before it’s too late.

Review:
Our movie reviewers included: Andrea Loran, Elinor Steffensen, Glenn Lippman, Jonathan Kahn, Judy Moskowitz, Larry Minsky, Ronni Mann, Sharon Helman, Susan Robbins.

Suggested Movie Headlines included: The Human Condition; Sensitive & Introspective; Profound; The Real Holmes; A Metaphor of Life

Favorite Scenes:
• Holmes with Anne as Holmes realizes how alone he is despite his intellectualism.
• Country and interior design is exquisite.
• White hills of Dover representing peace and death.
• Bee scenes with Holmes and Roger as they explore a generational bond.

Acting: Hands down, Holmes played by Ian McKellen was played out in award fashion. Ian’s ability to convince us of his failing memory and aging was significantly profound. Roger’s eyes and cupid’s bow upper lip. Cute kid. And Liney’s part was played incredibly well considering this time piece.

We learned that life needs to be in balance and that there is a significant difference between bees and wasps. We also believe that this movie is best suited for adults and an older audience.

Our reviewers reviewed this film as 86%. We very much liked it.

Review summarized by Glenn Lippman on July 21, 2015.

Comments:

“Loved it – beautiful scenery, great acting, rich themes about life and love.”  Ronni Mann

“Wonderful film, great venue, interesting conversations.  All around a great evening.”  Susan Robbins